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Education and Skills

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Introduction

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Publications (date ordered)

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Research and Practice

Coping Resources, Coping Processes, and Mental Health Shelley E. Taylor and Annette L. Stanton Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, California ,2007  Coping, defined as action-oriented and intrapsychic efforts to manage the demands created by stressful events, is coming to be recognized both for its significant impact on stress-related mental and physical health outcomes and for its intervention potential. We review coping resources that aid in this process, including individual differences in optimism, mastery, self-esteem, and social support, and examine appraisal and coping processes, especially those marked by approach or avoidance. We address the origins of coping resources and processes in genes, early life experience, and gene-environment interactions, and address neural underpinnings of coping that may shed light on evaluating coping interventions. We conclude by outlining possible intervention strategies for improving coping processes.

A systematic review of universal approaches to mental health promotion in schools Jane Wells Jane Barlow and Sarah Stewart-Brown, Health Education Volume 103 . Number 4 . 2003 Reviews previous studies of the universal approach to mental health promotion, and disease prevention programmes or interventions in schools. Over 8,000 publications were identified initially and 425 studies obtained for further review. The inclusion criteria were met by 17 (mostly US) studies investigating 16 interventions. Positive evidence of effectiveness was obtained for programmes that adopted a whole-school approach, were implemented continuously for more than a year, and were aimed at the promotion of mental health as opposed to the prevention of mental illness. Provides evidence that universal school mental health promotion programmes can be effective and suggests that long-term interventions promoting the positive mental health of all pupils and involving changes to the school climate are likely to be more successful than brief class-based mental illness prevention programmes. 

Promoting Children’s Mental Health within Early Years and School Settings Summary and key messages for schools, 2001 This summary offers pointers and examples of good practice to help school staff, working alongside mental health professionals, in early identification and intervention for pupils experiencing mental health problems.

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Videos and Presentations

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Organisations

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Links

Self-management is about the methods, skills, and strategies we use to effectively manage our own activities towards achieving certain objectives. For those of us who live with long-term mental health conditions, this means concentrating on interventions and developing training and skills to take care of - and gain direct control over - our lives.

Learn for mental wellbeing  Learning new skills can be useful, but it can also positively affect our mental wellbeing. It doesn’t have to mean getting more qualifications. There are many ways to bring learning into your life. Many of us associate learning with childhood or our student days. As adults, it can seem as though we have less time or need to learn new things. But evidence shows that continuing to learn throughout life can help improve and maintain our mental wellbeing. Mental wellbeing means feeling good – about yourself and the world around you – and being able to get on with life in the way you want. Learning can boost self-confidence and self-esteem, help build a sense of purpose, and help us connect with others.

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